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Mineralogy

Autunite

Autunite

Autunite is a uranium-rich greenish yellow secondary mineral. It is the result of the alteration of uraninite.

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Azurite

Azurite

Azurite got its name from its azure-blue colour due to the presence of hydrated copper.

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Fluorite

Fluorite

Formerly called « ore flower » by Middle Ages miners, fluorite (aka fluorspar) got its name at the end of...

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Fluorite

Fluorite

Fluorite has been used as an ornamental stone since Antiquity. Formerly called « ore flower » by Middle...

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Malachite

Malachite

Malachite is a green copper carbonate mineral.

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Natrolite

Natrolite

Formerly known as « mesotype », its name derives from the Spanish word natron, meaning « soda » (because...

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Quartz

Quartz

Quartz was called « rock crystal » until the 16th century. The word « quartz » appeared in 1500.

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Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite gets its name from the Greek rhodos, meaning « pink ». It is often found as a vein, amongst...

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Smithsonite

Smithsonite

This zinc carbonate - formerly known as « zinc spar » - got its name in honor of English chemist and...

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Sulphur

Sulphur

This mineral is a native element mineral. It means it occurs in nature in uncombined form with a distinct...

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Tiger's Eye

Tiger's Eye

Tiger's Eye gets its name from its golden to red-brown colour.

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Tourmaline

Tourmaline

Schorl is the most common variety of tourmaline. It can reach a size of up to 2 metres, although it is most...

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Vanadinite

Vanadinite

Wulfenite

Wulfenite

Wulfenite crystals used to be called « melinose » crystals (from the Greek meli, meaning « honey »)...

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The Museum's mineralogy collections

Mineralogy is a branch of geology which focuses on the study of minerals.

What is a mineral ?

A mineral is a naturally occurring chemical compound, characterised by its chemical composition (the atoms it contains) and its crystal structure (the ordered arrangement of its atoms).

Shapes and colours... Mineralogy catches the eye because of the beauty of its various specimens. However, shapes and colours of minerals are closely related to chemistry : iron, copper, sulphur, and other elements contained in minerals have a direct impact on the characteristics of crystals.

The Museum's collections include minerals from all over the world : blue azurite from Morocco, pink rhodochrosite from Argentina, black tourmaline from Madagascar, greenish yellow autunite from Haute-Vienne...

Explore the colour spectrum above to discover the Museum's mineralogy collections...

Autunite

Autunite is a uranium-rich greenish yellow secondary mineral. It is the result of the alteration of uraninite.

Azurite

Azurite got its name from its azure-blue colour due to the presence of hydrated copper.

Fluorite

Formerly called « ore flower » by Middle Ages miners, fluorite (aka fluorspar) got its name at the end of the 19th century. It derives from the Latin noun fluere, which means « to flow », because it helped make the molten metal flow during the smelting process.

Fluorite

Fluorite has been used as an ornamental stone since Antiquity. Formerly called « ore flower » by Middle Ages miners, fluorite (aka fluorspar) got its name at the end of the 19th century.

Malachite

Malachite is a green copper carbonate mineral.

Natrolite

Formerly known as « mesotype », its name derives from the Spanish word natron, meaning « soda » (because of its high sodium level), and the Greek word lithos, meaning « stone ».

Quartz

Quartz was called « rock crystal » until the 16th century. The word « quartz » appeared in 1500.

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite gets its name from the Greek rhodos, meaning « pink ». It is often found as a vein, amongst sedimentary rocks containing manganese minerals.

Smithsonite

This zinc carbonate - formerly known as « zinc spar » - got its name in honor of English chemist and mineralogist James Smithson (1754-1829), founder of the famous Smithsonian Institution, in Washington DC.

Sulphur

This mineral is a native element mineral. It means it occurs in nature in uncombined form with a distinct mineral structure. Its name is derived from the Latin sulphur, meaning « burning stone ».

Tiger's Eye

Tiger's Eye gets its name from its golden to red-brown colour.

Tourmaline

Schorl is the most common variety of tourmaline. It can reach a size of up to 2 metres, although it is most frequently found in the form of thin flakes in granites or schists.

Wulfenite

Wulfenite crystals used to be called « melinose » crystals (from the Greek meli, meaning « honey ») because of their honey-yellow colour.

Autunite

Autunite

Autunite is a uranium-rich greenish yellow secondary mineral. It is the result of the alteration of uraninite.

Scope note

Azurite

Azurite

Azurite got its name from its azure-blue colour due to the presence of hydrated copper.

Scope note

Fluorite

Fluorite

Formerly called « ore flower » by Middle Ages miners, fluorite (aka fluorspar) got its name at the end of...

Scope note

Fluorite

Fluorite

Fluorite has been used as an ornamental stone since Antiquity. Formerly called « ore flower » by Middle...

Scope note

Malachite

Malachite

Malachite is a green copper carbonate mineral.

Scope note

Natrolite

Natrolite

Formerly known as « mesotype », its name derives from the Spanish word natron, meaning « soda » (because...

Scope note

Quartz

Quartz

Quartz was called « rock crystal » until the 16th century. The word « quartz » appeared in 1500.

Scope note

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite

Rhodochrosite gets its name from the Greek rhodos, meaning « pink ». It is often found as a vein, amongst...

Scope note

Smithsonite

Smithsonite

This zinc carbonate - formerly known as « zinc spar » - got its name in honor of English chemist and...

Scope note

Sulphur

Sulphur

This mineral is a native element mineral. It means it occurs in nature in uncombined form with a distinct...

Scope note

Tiger's Eye

Tiger's Eye

Tiger's Eye gets its name from its golden to red-brown colour.

Scope note

Tourmaline

Tourmaline

Schorl is the most common variety of tourmaline. It can reach a size of up to 2 metres, although it is most...

Scope note

Vanadinite

Vanadinite

Wulfenite

Wulfenite

Wulfenite crystals used to be called « melinose » crystals (from the Greek meli, meaning « honey »)...

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Visit us

Free entry

How to find us ?
Muséum d'histoire naturelle
Place du Vieux Marché
76600 LE HAVRE
Phone : +33(0)2 35 41 37 28
museum@lehavre.fr

Opening hours

Open from Tuesday to Sunday :
from 10AM to noon
to 2PM to 76PM

Closed on Monday and Thursday morning

More information

The collection database

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