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Palaeontology

Acanthopleuroceras

Acanthopleuroceras

The La Roche Blain quarries, near Fresney-le-Puceux, are amongst the last quarries still in operation in the...

Scope note

Ammonite

Ammonite

Pictonia baylei ammonites – named after French palaeontologist Emile Bayle – can be found in the Lower...

Scope note

Campanile cornucopiae

Campanile cornucopiae

This remarkable assemblage containing five campaniles dates back to the Eocene (approximately 55 million...

Scope note

Chilotherium

Chilotherium

In the 90's, a large fossil skull was donated to the Le Havre Museum of Natural History after it was seized...

Scope note

Dinosaur eggs

Dinosaur eggs

Archaeological excavations were conducted in Rennes-le-Château by the Le Havre and Marseille Museums in...

Scope note

Dickinsonia d'Ediacara

Dickinsonia d'Ediacara

The site of Ediacara, in Australia, is a place of great palaeontological interest because of the antiquity...

Scope note

Fossil fish

Fossil fish

The Lepidotes lennieri is a fossil fish discovered at Cap de la Hève by Gustave Lennier. This unique...

Scope note

Graptolites

Graptolites

Graptolites are tiny marine organisms dating back to the end of the Cambrian Period.They were colonial...

Scope note

Marine crocodile

Marine crocodile

Oceanosuchus boecensis. It is one of the genuine treasures from the Museum's collections. This specimen dates...

Scope note

Megalodon tooth

Megalodon tooth

Megaselachus megalodon – which literally means « giant shark » and « giant tooth » - is an extinct...

Scope note

Nautilus

Nautilus

A nautilus is a cephalopod mollusc (from Greek -cephal, meaning « head », and -pod, meaning « foot »)....

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Nipadites

Nipadites

In 1998, the City of Fécamp donated its malacology, mineralogy, and palaeontology collections to the Le...

Scope note

Pecopteris

Pecopteris

This Pecopteris (from Greek -pec, meaning « comb », and -petri, meaning « wing ») dates back to the...

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Pliosaurus

Pliosaurus

This marine reptile had four flippers and an oblong body, providing better hydrodynamics while swimming. Its...

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Stromatolithe

Stromatolithe

Stromatoliths (from Greek -stroma, meaning « mattress », and -lithos, meaning « stone ») are geological...

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Trilobite Phacops

Trilobite Phacops

This trilobite is a member of the Phacops family (from Greek -phac, meaning « lentil », and -ops, meaning...

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Get ready to discover the creatures which graced the surface of the Earth 500 million years ago !

Palaeontology is the scientific study of life in the geological past. Paleontologists attempt to record all living species and the conditions in which they lived (eras, palaeoenvironments, and palaeoclimates).

The Museum's palaeontology collections are a testimony to the diversity of fossils available in the geological layers of the area. These collections explore the history of life on Earth, from the first complex organisms, dating back 600 million years, to the extinction of mammoths, 10,000 years BCE.

Dinosaurs, fossil fish, marine crocodiles, ammonites, and other extinct animals reflect the biodiversity of Normandy for hundreds of millions of years.

Embark on a journey through time and space and get ready to discover fascinating species by exploring the interactive timeline !

Acanthopleuroceras

The La Roche Blain quarries, near Fresney-le-Puceux, are amongst the last quarries still in operation in the area. In palaeontological terms, the La Roche Blain quarries are renowned for the remarkable specimens of calcified ammonites contained in the geological layers. This monumental block of stone – cut in two to open like a book – contains several ammonites and bivalves.

Ammonite

Pictonia baylei ammonites – named after French palaeontologist Emile Bayle – can be found in the Lower Kimmeridgian layers of Cap de la Hève.

Campanile cornucopiae

This remarkable assemblage containing five campaniles dates back to the Eocene (approximately 55 million years BCE) and was donated to the City of Le Havre by Olivier Gain.

Chilotherium

In the 90's, a large fossil skull was donated to the Le Havre Museum of Natural History after it was seized by customs services. Still enclosed in its matrix (the substance surrounding the fossil), it was disengaged and prepared at the Museum.

Dinosaur eggs

Archaeological excavations were conducted in Rennes-le-Château by the Le Havre and Marseille Museums in 1984. Several dinosaur eggs have been found in the clay layers of this village. The findings of these excavations are kept in the reserves of the Le Havre Museum.

Dickinsonia d'Ediacara

The site of Ediacara, in Australia, is a place of great palaeontological interest because of the antiquity and diversity of its fossils. The geological layers in which these fossils can be found date back to the Precambrian, 560 million years BCE.

Fossil fish

The Lepidotes lennieri is a fossil fish discovered at Cap de la Hève by Gustave Lennier. This unique specimen - described by Henri Emile Sauvage in 1893 - was named after its discoverer. Originally found in Lower Kimmeridge clays, it dates back 155 million years.

Graptolites

Graptolites are tiny marine organisms dating back to the end of the Cambrian Period.They were colonial animals, gathered around a branch on which each individual is housed within a cup-like structure.

Marine crocodile

Oceanosuchus boecensis. It is one of the genuine treasures from the Museum's collections. This specimen dates back to the Lower Cenomanian (Cretaceous Period, 100 million years BCE), when France was covered by a warm sea in which an extremely rich tropical wildlife thrived (ammonites, sponges...).

Megalodon tooth

Megaselachus megalodon – which literally means « giant shark » and « giant tooth » - is an extinct species of shark which lived from the end of the Oligocene (25 million years BCE) to the middle of the Pleistocene (1.5 million years BCE).

Nautilus

A nautilus is a cephalopod mollusc (from Greek -cephal, meaning « head », and -pod, meaning « foot »). The oldest nautiloid fossils found date back to 450 million years BCE (Cambrian), but 6 nautilus species are still extant today.

Nipadites

In 1998, the City of Fécamp donated its malacology, mineralogy, and palaeontology collections to the Le Havre Museum of Natural History. Six large fossilised fruit stood out amongst the large collection of fossils. They were found in Bellême (Orne) and date back to the Eocene Period, 40 million years BCE.

Pecopteris

This Pecopteris (from Greek -pec, meaning « comb », and -petri, meaning « wing ») dates back to the Carboniferous period, approximately 300 million years BCE. This giant tree fern could reach a height of several metres.

Pliosaurus

This marine reptile had four flippers and an oblong body, providing better hydrodynamics while swimming. Its 15 cm long teeth suggest its diet included ammonites, fish, and marine reptiles...

Stromatolithe

Stromatoliths (from Greek -stroma, meaning « mattress », and -lithos, meaning « stone ») are geological structures formed by the biological activity of microorganisms.

Trilobite Phacops

This trilobite is a member of the Phacops family (from Greek -phac, meaning « lentil », and -ops, meaning « vision »). It has an inflated headshield and big eyes. Its excellent condition allows us to examine its eyes in detail. They were composed of a multitude of lenses, providing an excellent large scope vision.

Acanthopleuroceras

Acanthopleuroceras

The La Roche Blain quarries, near Fresney-le-Puceux, are amongst the last quarries still in operation in the...

Scope note

Ammonite

Ammonite

Pictonia baylei ammonites – named after French palaeontologist Emile Bayle – can be found in the Lower...

Scope note

Campanile cornucopiae

Campanile cornucopiae

This remarkable assemblage containing five campaniles dates back to the Eocene (approximately 55 million...

Scope note

Chilotherium

Chilotherium

In the 90's, a large fossil skull was donated to the Le Havre Museum of Natural History after it was seized...

Scope note

Dinosaur eggs

Dinosaur eggs

Archaeological excavations were conducted in Rennes-le-Château by the Le Havre and Marseille Museums in...

Scope note

Dickinsonia d'Ediacara

Dickinsonia d'Ediacara

The site of Ediacara, in Australia, is a place of great palaeontological interest because of the antiquity...

Scope note

Fossil fish

Fossil fish

The Lepidotes lennieri is a fossil fish discovered at Cap de la Hève by Gustave Lennier. This unique...

Scope note

Graptolites

Graptolites

Graptolites are tiny marine organisms dating back to the end of the Cambrian Period.They were colonial...

Scope note

Marine crocodile

Marine crocodile

Oceanosuchus boecensis. It is one of the genuine treasures from the Museum's collections. This specimen dates...

Scope note

Megalodon tooth

Megalodon tooth

Megaselachus megalodon – which literally means « giant shark » and « giant tooth » - is an extinct...

Scope note

Nautilus

Nautilus

A nautilus is a cephalopod mollusc (from Greek -cephal, meaning « head », and -pod, meaning « foot »)....

Scope note

Nipadites

Nipadites

In 1998, the City of Fécamp donated its malacology, mineralogy, and palaeontology collections to the Le...

Scope note

Pecopteris

Pecopteris

This Pecopteris (from Greek -pec, meaning « comb », and -petri, meaning « wing ») dates back to the...

Scope note

Pliosaurus

Pliosaurus

This marine reptile had four flippers and an oblong body, providing better hydrodynamics while swimming. Its...

Scope note

Stromatolithe

Stromatolithe

Stromatoliths (from Greek -stroma, meaning « mattress », and -lithos, meaning « stone ») are geological...

Scope note

Trilobite Phacops

Trilobite Phacops

This trilobite is a member of the Phacops family (from Greek -phac, meaning « lentil », and -ops, meaning...

Scope note

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Muséum d'histoire naturelle
Place du Vieux Marché
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Phone : +33(0)2 35 41 37 28
museum@lehavre.fr

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