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Dickinsonia d'Ediacara

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13282000One of the older complex multicellularThis 3 cm wide fossil is called Dickinsonia costata. It is an iconic fossil from Ediacara, in Australia, a site renowned for the antiquity and diversity of its fossils.One of the older complex...This 3 cm wide fossil is called Dickinsonia costata. It is an iconic fossil from Ediacara, in...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/dsc_5830.jpg?itok=7zN5AYLkLe Havre Museum of Natural History - Photo C. Livonnen
13282000Dating from the Precambrian (560 million years BCE), these fossils are amongst the earliest known traces of complex multicellular life on Earth.Dating from the Precambrian (560 million years BCE), these fossils are amongst the earliest known...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/dsc_5834.jpg?itok=h3JEHhYlLe Havre Museum of Natural History - Photo : C. Livonnen

Ediacaran Dickinsonia costata

 

  • Binomial name : Dickinsonia costata

  • Collector/Donor : unknown

  • Period :  Precambrian (560 million years BCE)

  • Origin : Australia

  • Diameter : 3 cm

The site of Ediacara, in Australia, is a place of great palaeontological interest because of the antiquity and diversity of its fossils.

The geological layers in which these fossils can be found date back to the Precambrian, 560 million years BCE.

The Museum of Natural History owns two specimens from Ediacara.

The Dickinsonia costata is the most common fossil found in Ediacara. It comes under the form of a small, radially-segmented, oval imprint on the surface of a standstone bed.

It is commonly accepted that Dickinsonia was an organism capable of moving, since trackways of Dickinsonia fossils have been found. However, its classification remains open to debate. It might be a member of the annelid family (ringed worms), although that remains uncertain.

To learn more

Retallack, G.J. (2007). "Growth, decay and burial compaction of Dickinsonia, an iconic Ediacaran fossil" (PDF). Alcheringa: an Australasian Journal of Palaeontology 31 (3): 215–240.

Glaessner, Martin F., Wade M. (1966) - The late Precambrian fossils from Ediacara, South Australia. Palaeontology 9 (4), pp. 599-628

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