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Spindle whorl

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13282000Spindle whorlUsually made of stone, clay, or even deer antlers, spindle whorls often provide the only indication of the emergence of textiles from the Neolithic Era to Antiquity. Indeed, the wooden elements of spinning devices and textiles have disappeared over time.Spindle whorlUsually made of stone, clay, or even deer antlers, spindle whorls often provide the only indication...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/2012.3.29_c.jpg?itok=as8h-wmDLe Havre Museum – Photo credit : C. Livonnen
13282000Spindle whorlSpindle whorlZoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/2012.3.29_a.jpg?itok=HzpHJfSfLe Havre Museum – Photo credit : C. Livonnen
13282000Le poids de la fusaîole assure par la force d'inertie la rotation régulière du fuseau d’un filage à la main.Le poids de la fusaîole assure par la force d'inertie la rotation régulière du fuseau d’un...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/2012.3.29.jpg?itok=oFiwc815Le Havre Museum – Photo credit : C. Livonnen

 

Spindle whorl

 

  • Origin : Forêt de Montgeon, Le Havre, Seine-Maritime

  • Period : Gaul

  • Raw material : clay

  • Inventory number : 2012.3.29

  • Le Havre Museum's collections

 

A spindle whorl is a disc or spherical object fitted onto the spindle to increase and maintain the speed of the spin. Usually made of stone, clay, or even deer antlers, spindle whorls often provide the only indication of the emergence of textiles from the Neolithic Era to Antiquity. Indeed, thewooden elements of spinning devices and textiles have disappeared over time.

These small conical objects can also be found in ancient tombs. Their use in this context is yet to be understood.

In ancient Gaul and Gallo-Roman times, spindle whorls were mostly made of pottery shards and pieces of broken pots which were rounded up and pierced.

Related objects

Biface

The biface was a multifunctional tool. Its cutting edges were used to chop wood, to cut meat, or to scrape skins. Its tip was used to pierce holes or to unearth roots.

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