You are here

Tasmania

Back
1000752Indigenous Tasmanian womanIndigenous Tasmanian woman, N.-M. Petit, 1802Indigenous Tasmanian womanIndigenous Tasmanian woman, N.-M. Petit, 1802Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition_portrait/public/multimedia/20004-2r_det_0.jpg?itok=TnZn4M2mMuséum du Havre
1000751Indigenous Tasmanian man called GrouagraraHis clothing is probably kangaroo skin. Indigenous Tasmanian man called Grouagrara, N.-M. Petit, 1802Indigenous Tasmanian man called...His clothing is probably kangaroo skin. Indigenous Tasmanian man called Grouagrara, N.-M. Petit,...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition_portrait/public/multimedia/20007-2_det.jpg?itok=5nEJJpF3Muséum du Havre
1000754Indigenous Tasmanian man called ParabériHis clothing is probably kangaroo skin. Indigenous Tasmanian man called Parabéri, N.-M. Petit, 1802Indigenous Tasmanian man called...His clothing is probably kangaroo skin. Indigenous Tasmanian man called Parabéri, N.-M. Petit,...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition_portrait/public/multimedia/20018-1_det.jpg?itok=t9o9jCDrMuséum du Havre
14882000Tasmanian canoeThe team of savants also observed the small boats there. This type of Tasmanian dugout canoe was made from tree bark and could hold two or three people. Tasmanian canoe, C.-A. Lesueur and/or N.-M.Petit, 1802Tasmanian canoeThe team of savants also observed the small boats there. This type of Tasmanian dugout canoe was...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/18005_det.jpg?itok=cKXdrBdzMuséum du Havre
8042000Burial sites on Maria IslandPeron and Lesueur showed great interest in burial sites. Note the bark engraved with motifs, the precise meanings of which are still unclear today. In the publication Reflexions on the various methods of observation of savage people, a sort of ‘manual of ethnography’, by J. M. de Gérando notably describes the need for savants to observe how individuals relate to death, seeing as this is such an important element of human societies. Burial sites on Maria Island, Tasmania, C.-A. Lesueur and/or N.-M.Petit, 1802 Burial sites on Maria IslandPeron and Lesueur showed great interest in burial sites. Note the bark engraved with motifs, the...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/18024_det.jpg?itok=wwWTdShiMuséum du Havre
1000803Weapons, vessels, ornaments, TasmaniaTwo clubs, two lances, a basket made from woven rushes, a vessel and a shell necklace. Works with this kind of careful and symmetrical arrangement of objects are typical of the early 19th century. The expedition brought back 206 objects, all now disappeared. Only these drawings are left to give an idea of the material culture of these populations. ‘Weapons, vessels, ornaments’, Tasmania, C.-A. Lesueur, 1802Weapons, vessels, ornaments,...Two clubs, two lances, a basket made from woven rushes, a vessel and a shell necklace. Works with...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition_portrait/public/multimedia/18011-1_det.jpg?itok=zdc3jrZbMuséum du Havre
16282000EmuEmu Dromaius sp., C.-A. Lesueur, between 1804 and 1809EmuEmu Dromaius sp., C.-A. Lesueur, between 1804 and 1809Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/79001-1_det.jpg?itok=_qQqIvG-Muséum du Havre
1000760Red-throated tricolour PseudoThis bird lives in southern Australia and Tasmania. Red-throated tricolour pseudo, Petroica multicolor, C.-A. Lesueur, 1802Red-throated tricolour PseudoThis bird lives in southern Australia and Tasmania. Red-throated tricolour pseudo, Petroica...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition_portrait/public/multimedia/79005_det.jpg?itok=e6MvCwkUMuséum du Havre
9052000Yellow-bellied parrotThis parrot was observed and painted at North-West Port, Tasmania. Yellow-bellied parrot, Platycerus caledonicus, C.-A. Lesueur, 1802Yellow-bellied parrotThis parrot was observed and painted at North-West Port, Tasmania. Yellow-bellied parrot,...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/79030_det.jpg?itok=wJbV3bYgMuséum du Havre
12682000Echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus Like the platypus, the echidna lays and sits on eggs, but also has features of a mammal: it has fur, and the females suckle the young. It can be up to 50cm long, weighing 6kg at that size. It lives in Tasmania in burrows, and comes out at night to feed on ants that it catches with its sticky tongue. When in danger it rolls itself into a ball or buries itself in the sand. At the time of reproduction, the female’s belly hollows into a pouch into which the egg falls. The egg hatches after 10 days, and the young stay in the pouch to feed from the mammary glands, only emerging once they’re covered in fur. Echidnas live for around 50 years. Echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus (Geoffroy, 1803), C.-A. Lesueur, between 1804 and Echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus...Like the platypus, the echidna lays and sits on eggs, but also has features of a mammal: it has...Zoom http://www.museum-lehavre.fr/sites/default/files/styles/exposition/public/multimedia/80031_det.jpg?itok=RzyFYKRLMuséum du Havre

Two months in Tasmania, since january to march 1802

The boats left Timor for Van Diemen’s Land on 13 November 1801. Close to twenty people on each boat were sick, and they were mourning the deaths of the zoologists Levillain and Mauger and the assistant gardiner Sautier.

However in spite of all this Baudin pursued the exploration of Tasmania and the islands along the south-east coast.

The D’Entrecasteaux Channel was rich with forests and bird life in contrast to the coasts, which were more hostile. Many maps were drawn up, notably using names related to the expedition, such as Peron Peninsula on Maria Island, and Geographe Strait.

The indigeous people were described as sometimes hostile, sometimes welcoming. Peron and Petit drew portraits of them. The women amongst them seemed at times miserable and the following interaction with the sailors was indicative of their contact with them:

 

‘On every occasion that we’ve met the women we’ve noticed that they always stay in the background to prepare themselves, by grinding charcoal and mixing it with their saliva on their faces. If these beautiful women had consulted us, it is likely that they would not have gone to so much effort to please us. Going by a custom as bizarre as this, one can see that the people of New Holland have a unique concept of female beauty: the Venus of this country no doubt holds her court under coal mine.’

Pierre-Bernard Milius, Journal of the voyage, p.35. French transcription: P. Hauguel, authorised by M. Shand Kidd.

Visit us

Free entry

How to find us ?
Muséum d'histoire naturelle
Place du Vieux Marché
76600 LE HAVRE
Phone : +33(0)2 35 41 37 28
museum@lehavre.fr

Opening hours

Open from Tuesday to Sunday :
from 10AM to noon
to 2PM to 76PM

Closed on Monday and Thursday morning

More information

The collection database

Up